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Friday
Oct072011

Then and Now Friday: Fifth Avenue and Ninth Street, 1931

A day late, but certainly not a dollar short. Continuing our look at the bustling corner of Fifth Avenue and Ninth Street, once one of the borough's main shopping and entertainment destinations, today we take a look at the only non-bustling corner of the intersection, the southwest one. Back in 1931, the corner was only occupied by a news stand, but as we zoom out a little...

We see the Fifth Ave Diner, with its penny scale, hanging "LUNCH" sign, and classic railcar look. Man, I wish that was still there. Up above it there's a wall ad for Germain's, the "Great Shopping Center" on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 15th Street.

Why would this corner, at the center of all the action, be so empty? The land actually belongs to the IRT IND Subway, which goes underground just to the west of this site.

The site is still home to one-story buildings, even though the diner and news stand were demolished years ago. A large housing development now towers over the site, but funny enough, there's still a news stand on the corner and a small diner just two storefronts down from where it used to be. At the far left is Neergaard's Pharmacy, which has been in that location since 1888 and has been open 24/7 since World War I.

Top Photos: Brooklyn's Park Slope, Merlis and Rosenzweig. 1999.

 

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Reader Comments (2)

It is not the IRT that heads underground there, but the IND subway.

October 7, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterAndrew Sidrane

That corner was always a newsstand, and a very busy one in the old days when folks used rush out several times a day to get the later editions. Especially folks who bet on the ponies, and there were a lot of them in the old Slope.

June 5, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterdan sciannameo

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