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Entries in Closed for Business (152)

Thursday
Aug212014

Closed for Business: Terroir, 284 Fifth Avenue

Nearly two years after its high-profile opening on the corner of Fifth Avenue and First Street and 3 1/2 months since the space was put on the market, the only Brooklyn location of "elitist wine bar for everyone" Terroir has shuttered.

The mini-chain, which has locations in the East Village (the original), Murray Hill, Tribeca, and a seasonal one on the High Line, is run by Hearth team chef Marco Canora and sommelier Paul Grieco, two of the most respected guys in the business. This location had a solid selection of wines, small plates, and charcuterie, as well as a nice brunch, a reasonable and creative happy hour ($3 glasses of sherry!), and a generally funky, humorous attitude.

I reached out to Grieco, and he replied with his trademark brand of humor, saying that "unfortunately business realities doth sometimes interfere with the pursuit of a good glass of grape juice."

He also confirmed that a new tenant has been lined up for the space, but that he'll let them make the announcement when the time is right.

Monday
Jul282014

Closed for Business: Cheeburger Cheeburger, 222 Seventh Avenue

Here's some interesting news: The Seventh Avenue and Third Street location of Cheeburger Cheeburger, the chain specializing in gutbusting burgers and milkshakes, has shuttered. Many thanks to a tipster for sending the above photo of a sign on their door announcing that they've closed for good, and nobody is answering the phone.

The location opened in February 2011 in the prime space long-occpuied by Miracle Grill, and was one of the first big chains to open up on that stretch of Seventh. Many believed that a chain restaurant onslaught would follow, but all we got instead was one perpetually empty Subway, a Pinkberry, and a whole lot of empty storefronts. It also never really developed a following among locals; those visiting the hospital appeared to make up the bulk of the clientele.

So we can add one more empty storefront, most likely with an astronomical asking price, to this part of Seventh. Cheeburger isn't Shake Shack by any stretch of the imagination, but if not even the big chains can make it here, then who can?

 

Tuesday
May202014

Closed for Business: Guvnor's Vintage Thrift, 178 5th Avenue

Guvnor's, the expansive vintage thrift shop on 5th Avenue between Degraw and Sackett, closed down for good as the Fifth Avenue fair ended on Sunday after more than four years in the space.

The shop had an old-school rock and roll vibe, and the merchandise for sale, some of which dated back to the 1930s, was all undoubtedly cool, and well-curated. It was the brainchild of owner Suzette Sundae, who's owned eight similar shops in the past 20-odd years and posted a lengthy letter/airing of grievances back in January explaining the reasons behind her closure of arbuably the best vintage store in the neighborhood. Namely, she finds that the neighborhood has lost its rock-and-roll attitude and is suffering from a lack of "cultural richness."

"Anyone visiting Park Slope these days, could likely detect a marked lack in the ol' rock n roll, except at Enz's (across the street) and at a handful of bars," she wrote. "I’m not sensing a lot of 'cultural richness' either, with the exception of the cheese fridge, over at Bierkraft."

She continues: "Fewer and fewer of our “fashion-forward,” “vintagista” shoppers have been strolling in, but the strollers . . . well, those strollers continue streaming past, in endless waves of upper middle class, conservative earth tones ... The thought of selling khaki jackets and baby buggies appeals as much to me as eating Wonderbread dipped in milk ... Sure, we could move to Williamsburg, or Bushwick, but what about when those neighborhoods suffer a similar 'Conservo Scourge?'"

Sundae's rant reminds me a bit of what the owners of Southpaw said after announcing their closure, blaming it on the neighborhood's supposed shortcomings. She adds that she decided to sell the space for "generous compensation" and will now be "pursuing a life of creative freedom," and vowed that the shop will be moving online, but at the moment the Etsy store only has 13 items listed.

Tuesday
Apr292014

Closed for Business: Percy's/ South Brooklyn Pizza, 447 1st Street

The outpost of South Brooklyn Pizza on First Street just west of 7th Avenue, part of a mini-chain regarded by many as the purveyors of the finest slice in New York, has closed up shop four months after adding $1 slices to the menu and changing the name to Percy's.

The closure comes on the heels of continuing trouble for the chain and its owner James McGown, who has a long history of legal troubles. The switch to a dollar slice format was obviously in response to customers' unwillingness to pay $5 per slice (even though the ingredients used are top notch, and it's actually a very solid slice of pizza), and just a couple days ago the location on 1st Avenue in the East Village announced plans to move to a new, TBA location. For those who need their fix, the location on Fourth Avenue is still open.

Many thanks to reader Michael for sending the above photo.

Tuesday
Apr222014

Trois Pommes, A'Putia Closed for Business on Fifth

As expected, Trois Pommes Patisserie has shut down, leaving the neighborhood after 7 years on Fifth between Garfield and Carroll due to a rent hike. The now-vacant space is on the market for $8,500/month; meanwhile, owner Emily Isaac is on the lookout for a space in a less-expensibe neighborhood.

A couple blocks away, between Lincoln and Berkeley, A'Putia has also closed down. The four month-old Sicilian bakery specialized in cannoli made with sheep's milk ricotta, and replaced under-the-radar gelato favorite Caramello (we'll forget that Cafe Saint Edesia was also open inside the space for about a week).