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Entries in Closed for Business (157)

Friday
Oct102014

Closed for Business: Campo de' Fiori, 187 Fifth Avenue

Campo de' Fiori, the four year-old pizzeria on the corner of Fifth and Berkeley that specialized in Roman-style pizza ala pala, appears to have closed for good. The restaurant has been entirely cleared out, and a worker inside the space confirmed that it won't be re-opening. Many thanks to a tipster for sending the above photo of the work in progress.

Owner Andrea Dal Monte spent 15 years perfecting his dough recipe, and the unique pizzas were characterized by their square shape, light and crisp crust, and tasty toppings like the bacon and pecorino on their popular Matriciana. It had trouble finding its niche, however, and was never exactly packed, even though it was able to stick around for four years.

I've reached out to Dal Monte for details, and will update if I hear back.

Tuesday
Oct072014

Yogurberry Closed, Luscious Food Closing on Fifth

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Some closing news to report from the north end of Fifth Avenue: Yogurberry, the generic fro-yo shop that opened in May of 2012 on the corner of Prospect, closed up shop last week, and the 10 year-old Luscious Foods, the homestyle prepared foods and sandwich shop between St. Marks and Bergen, will be closing at the end of the month.

"Rumors are true. Luscious Food will be closing this month," owner Christine Zeni said in an email. "Our ten year lease is up and the new lease offer is awful. So we have no choice but to close our doors. We thank all of our customers whom have made us a part of their family. We will miss you all."

Yogurberry, which has locations as far reaching as Nigeria, Paraguay, and India, has had trouble making a go of it in New York, where a Flatiron district location also closed recently. In a market that's been oversaturated with fro-yo shops for years, it really had nothing to separate it from the pack.

As for Luscious, the news comes as a disappointment. The sandwiches (like the Slow Ro, with roast beef, caramelized onions, Swiss cheese and horseradish spread) were creative and tasty, and the rotating menu of prepared salads, sides, and main dishes was always good in a pinch. Zeni's desserts are outrageous as well; make sure you try her oatmeal cream pie cookies before the last day on October 31.

Friday
Oct032014

Closed for Business: Uncle Arthur's Cafe, 237 9th Street

Uncle Arthur's Cafe, which opened back in April on Ninth Street just west of Fourth Avenue, has closed. A "Closed for Renovations" sign was posted on the front door, but owner Richard Gussoff confirmed that it won't be re-opening.

The restaurant, which doubled as a cafe during the morning rush, was generally well-reviewed, but its off-the-beaten-path location didn't do it any favors. Gussoff, who has met with great success as the chef behind the popular wintertime pop-up The Soup Bowl on Seventh near Ninth Street, added that his business partner promised to operate the business when Gussoff left mid-October to re-open the Soup Bowl but later reneged, saying that he's "at this time unable to take on this responsibiity."

While it's disappointing that this venture didn't work out for Gussoff, who lives in the neighborhood and has won serious praises for his soups, it's good to know that he'll be opening The Soup Bowl for the winter once again later this month in its regular location at 319 7th Avenue. He's also looking into opening a second location this winter on Smith Street.

Photo via Yelp

Tuesday
Sep302014

Closed for Business: A.O.C. Bistro, 259 5th Avenue

A.O.C. Bistro, the French restaurant on the corner of 5th Avenue and Garfield Place, has closed up shop. It's been shuttered for the past few days, the phone has been disconnected, and several tipsters have written in to let me know that it's closed for good.

The restaurant opened in August 2007, and was one of those places that always seemed to be full even though nobody ever talked about going there. It was a popular inexpensive brunch spot with its menu of French classics like croque monsieur and salade Nicoise, and the dinner menu was by-the-book French bistro, with offerings including poulet frites, coq au vin, duck confit, and moules marinere. They also introduced a couple specials in recent years, including a $1 oyster promotion. It wasn't one of the best restaurants in the neighborhood by any means, but it certainly filled a niche.

The space was actually first listed back in January 2012. This joins an increasing number of vacant prime storefronts on this stretch of Fifth, including the ones last occupied by Guvnor's and Terroir. Hopefully the string of vacancies that's taken over the north end of Seventh Avenue hasn't found its way east, but at this rate the space will probably become a nail salon.

Friday
Sep052014

Closed for Business: Brooklyn Fish Camp, 162 5th Avenue

After ten years, Brooklyn Fish Camp, the seafood restaurant on 5th between St. John's and Lincoln, has closed up shop. It hasn't been open since last weekend, and the now-defunct website says simply, "Our 10-year lease is up." A tipster told me that a rent increase was the reason for the closure, and indeed the new rent seems to be significantly higher than the previous one.

The restaurant, an offshoot of the West Village's popular Mary's Fish Camp, was put on the market briefly last February, but that appeared to be a false alarm. The asking price back then was $6,333 per month, which was  reasonable for the location considering that there was enough room for a bar area and backyard. Now, the 1,200 square foot space is on the market for $10,500. "Suggested uses" on the listing include "restaurant, specialty food retail, retail clothing, shoes and accessories, cosmetics, jewelry."

Fish Camp wasn't cheap, but the food was consistently high-quality and the concept was novel for the neighborhood. They offered a decent happy hour and occasionally had fun specials like all-you-could-eat-and-drink peel-and-eat shrimp and beer, but apparently that wasn't enough to sustain it.